CATEGORY: Aftermarket

Sell Your Premium Domains Through Afternic! + Afternic

We are very excited to announce that is the latest registrar to join Afternic‘s domain listing service! This means you can now opt-in to list your premium domain names on their marketplace to find potential buyers. And if you make a sale on the Afternic marketplace, the transfer of the domain will be very fast, instead of waiting two weeks for the funds to go through Escrow and then finally to you.

To opt-in your domains into this marketplace, you will just need to follow these simple steps:

  • Sign up for an account on Afternic
  • Confirm your account via the email confirmation
  • Start adding your premium domains into your account
  • Make sure you select “Premium Promotion” when you add your domains
  • Follow the instructions on the opt-in email you receive after adding your domains

Not too long ago, Art discussed the benefits of premium domains and in Afternic’s press release, CEO, Bill Mushkin also touches on this and states that “The use of premium domain names to drive traffic and rank well through SEO is becoming more mainstream and is being used by small and big businesses alike.”

He then goes on to add “Joining Afternic’s DLS allows us to connect more sellers and potential buyers through the industry’s largest reseller network, giving sellers the best chance to sell their domain and buyers the best chance to find the perfect domain for their project or business.” A statement that really touches on one of our main goals here at to provide the best tools and services to help you with your various domain name needs.

While other registrars may provide aftermarket services, they are often not the best experience for the customer. We are confident that by utilizing Afternic’s marketplace, we can not just help you sell and buy your premium names, but make the experience a pleasant one.

Domain Aftermarket Newsletter Launches Friday is launching a daily domain aftermarket newsletter this week. Our clients have been asking us for this for months. Now we finally have a lineup of domain names at prices that we feel represents a broad enough range to entice everyone.

With a variety of price points starting at $20 for expiring names from the family of registrars to tens of thousands of dollars for names from our brokerage clients – there’s a little something for everyone.

Sign up now so you don’t miss a single domain: Aftermarket Domain Names Unwrapped

Recall Media’s one-name-per-day auction site, bowed today with the inaugural auction of Was is a success? Only the team over at can say for sure. There were four bidders with a total of 20 bids on the name. That’s better than almost all of the low reserve/no reserve names at the last TRAFFIC auction in Orlando. The end result was a winning bid of $911US.

The appraisals for varied from lows of $500 to highs of $15k targeted at end-users. My own appraisal of $750-1500 was based on a variety of factors including past sales, recent offers on my own domains, industry trends and end-usage. I might have a couple of factors I’ll keep under my hat, but overall this isn’t rocket science. End-users are not the target for and value expectations that take the end-user into account aren’t going to hit the mark here.

Does having industry expert appraisers weigh in on a name help or hinder the auction process? It might mean that some names get less, but I think it’s best for the industry as a whole. Overpaying for names means the industry is in a bubble (and look where that gets the real estate market). Having realistic appraisals and data on the likely end-use and/or development for a name presents us all with the opportunity to create a stable marketplace that will continue to grow over time.

Would I use Bido to move some of my names? You bet. There are many names in my portfolio that I either hand-regged or picked up in a drop or otherwise paid very little for. Why would I *not* take a few hundred to a couple thousand dollars for them? Are there names in this group that I’m not willing to trust the model to? Of course. But the crown jewels are few and far between. Domain investors who can be honest with themselves over their portfolio and the likelihood of a big payday for those mid-tier domains might find great success at

Cheers to the team.

SimulScribe Buys Rebranding for Growth

TechCrunch is reporting that Voice to Text messaging provider SimulScribe has acquired the domain name for $30k and is planning on rebranding under the new name starting April 25. It appears that Strong Inc. was the seller.

The name SimulScribe totally sucks for our business. People have a real challenge remembering the name and they cannot spell it, which is a real problem considering that new customers need to type in our web address to sign up. When your company offers a consumer product that relies on viral marketing, a difficult name is a really bad thing. In fact, I’m constantly amazed at how well we have been able to do with such a shitty name.

I am not sure I could be in greater agreement that this company needed a new name. I had no idea what they did based on their name. While it’s still not obvious from I at least know it has something to do with phones and it’s catchy.

TechCrunch is also running a poll on whether readers think the name was overpriced or not. As of this writing 320 respondents say no, to 87 yes.

Domain Roundtable Auction Results April 2008

The auction has been slow starting, but there are spurts of activity. So far the most action has been on lot #82 – Retire(d).net, which sold to the room for $23,500.

Through 90 lots there’s been 20 sales for $82,970 total. More to come.

Through 160 lots 38 names have sold for a total of $177, 520

Here are the final results. Note, several domains were revisited after the gavel originally dropped.

83 Names sold for a total of $416,012.

That’s a tenth of the total $ and about half of the total number of domains from the first auction in Seattle. Attendance was down considerably from last year. I’m sure that contributed to the lack of blockbuster sales. Last year saw three high five figure deals, four six figure deals as well as a million dollar winning bid on Rebate(s).com totalling $2.5m. This year those deals were conspicuously absent. The big winner this year was at $25k. The average sale was just over $5k.

Lot | DomainName | $

3 $4,500
4 $12,000
10 $200
12 $1,500
21 $300
26 $3,500
29 $410
35 $1,000
38 $3,000
43 $1,000
46 $3,800
47 $3,100
48 $500
49 $900
51 $100
54 $1,001
63 $1,850
66 $2,900
80 $900
81 $15,000
82 $23,500
88 $2,000
93 $3,000
94 $3,200
101 $2,900
102 $400
103 $23,000
105 $7,600
108 $4,700
109 $10,000
110 $6,000
111 $7,000
112 $4,500
115 $4,700
119 $4,000
122 $4,000
124 $8,200
126 $1,000
129 $1,000
141 $1,750
142 $2,000
152 $2,500
156 $1,500
158 $400
161 $2,900
164 $2,000
165 $10,000
170 $250
171 $7,000
172 $300
174 $1,200
179 $300
180 $500
189 $5,000
190 $1,250
193 $5,000
198 $1,600
204 $11,000
205 $6,600
209 $5,000
221 $1,000
233 $1,300
243 $25,000
247 $16,000
254 $11,000
256 $4,900
257 $4,300
263 $17,000
264 $200
270 $18,000
275 $2,500
280 $2,100
281 $500
289 $17,000
294 $201
296 $11,000
303 $6,700
308 $4,200
313 $3,500
314 $10,000
316 $12,000
326 $1,000
348 $400

Aside from the numbers the auction moved much quicker than last year. I’m not sure about the future of Roundtable/DomainTools auctions. They are up against the juggernaut of Moniker/SnapNames. I like the idea of the Roundtable auctions because the auction agreement is much less restrictive than Moniker’s, but at the end of the day if the bidders aren’t showing up it isn’t going to matter. UDRP Decision That Makes Sense

UDRP threats can wreak havoc on aftermarket buyers sleep patterns. When it comes to high priced generic auctions and sales it’s commonly thought that there’s no way anyong would drop a UDRP. But it happens. It happened to Xedoc Holdings after they layed out $166k for in a Pool auction.

In what I hope becomes a common determining factor, the panel determined that the wide ranging generic nature of the domain name offsets the TM held by SuperValu Inc.:

Involved here is a common, descriptive word. It is not, in fact, associated by most people in the English-speaking world with the trademark of a regional US grocery chain. This domain name is worth $166,000 at auction precisely because it is a popular generic term with commercial connotations.

Will that discussion point mean that we might see higher bids on some names that investors might have shied away from previously? Time will tell.

Domain Roundtable Auction List Shaping Up

Jay over at Name Intelligence/ just released a sneak peek at some of the low reserve domain names which will be on the auction block during the Domain Roundtable Auction on April 21, 2008. Jay has gotten a lot of flak recently about the quality of names in his online only auctions. Between these names and his previously announced list of some of the premium names I think this should shape up to be a nice auction.

I know I’ll be keeping an eye out for a few bargains. There’s already a couple I have my sights set on.

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