Get premium .NEWS domains for not-so-premium pricing


.NEWS is currently available for preorder, and it’ll be available for immediate registration on July 15 (or July 8, if you’re interested in EAP). We think it’s one of the best New Domains to come out yet—it’s great for everyone, from big brands and media corporations to individual bloggers and journalists.

One of the cool things about the .NEWS launch is there are 30,000 (THIRTY THOUSAND!) premium value domains that will be available for standard pricing. So you can get a really short, memorable .NEWS like or, and it won’t cost you any more than a standard registration. You can view the complete list of premium-value-but-standard-priced* .NEWS domains here (.CSV file, right click to save). The list is deemed accurate as of the start of EAP on July 8, at which point the domains will be available to the general public.

Updated for June 2015: Collision lists, and how to get a previously unreleased domain name

This post contains a lengthy explanation of collision lists and previously unreleased domain names. But if you’d like to just skip to finding out when previously unreleased domains will be released (grouped by date and TLD) go here.
The domain name industry has a habit of taking a simple concept and adding a bunch of acronyms, background knowledge, technical jargon, and unnecessary details, until the simple concept becomes inaccessibly complicated. Name collision issues are a good example of these tendencies. In an effort to get back to basics, here’s a simplified explanation of name collision issues* and how you can use them to your advantage.

The Domain Awareness Tour Goes to Boulder

There’s no better way to get the word out than to impede someone’s progress on the sidewalk and yell at them about their choice of domain registrar. OK, it’s not that extreme (you’ll have to watch the video to find out,) but the Domain Awareness Tour is in Boulder, CO and sharing free domains with anyone who will listen. Everybody has been really nice because:

A) It’s Boulder.

B) Domains are the best marketing tool money can buy.

C) We plied all of the participants with their choice of a free .NINJA, .VIDEO or .SOCIAL domain names.

.VIDEO | For SEO, for simplicity, for only the hottest thing online

There’s a lot going on with video right now. For one, it’s taken over the Internet. Just last Saturday Periscope turned the Pay-Per-View “Fight of the Century” into a free-for-all for anyone with a smart phone. Barely a year ago the Ice Bucket Challenge morphed everyone’s backyard into a set piece for fund raisers dousing themselves in cold water and, in turn, catapulted Facebook past YouTube in video views. Twitter offers video now, as does its offspring Vine, and we probably shouldn’t dismiss Snapchat and Facebook’s Instagram beast. Trying to tackle this trend is where your .VIDEO comes in. Customer Rakes in Cash from .COM

There should be a business version of “stop and smell the roses” that goes something like “pause right now and talk to your customers.” Whenever we do we learn a lot, and Adam is no exception. We were excited enough to hear that a namer had won the Verisign .COM domain contest–well, he’s a semifinalist, but he has a check for five grand on the way–yet we were blown away that this is a guy behind the Singing Dogs because, for reals, he plays the saxophone and his dogs sing along. No, really, check out the video above.

Controlling the message: Why you probably don’t need to worry about .SUCKS

Screen Shot 2015-04-23 at 10.12.48 AM

Photo credit: JD Hancock

Let’s talk about “Obamacare.” Not the broad, sweeping health insurance program in general, but the word itself. It was originally meant to be derisive, painting the Affordable Care Act as the result of overreaching Executive power. At one point a Democratic Congresswoman objected to its use on Capitol Hill. But then something happened: it gradually took on a whole new life as a universal and sometimes affectionate term for the medical overhaul. The hashtag #ILikeObamacare trended when the bill was challenged in Supreme Court, and President Obama even started using it in his own speeches.

This is a classic example of one side making the best of an attack. They completely redefined it, and now they don’t need to get a .SUCKS.