TAG: domains

5 reasons why .IO is a powerful domain choice

It’s rare now to come across someone who has not at least heard of the .IO domain name—the extension that originally served as a ccTLD for the British Indian Ocean Territory took off several years ago among web innovators and remains a popular domain choice for startups and tech companies.

If you’re considering registering your own .IO domain name, but still have some hesitations, check out this list of reasons why .IO could be an excellent domain choice for building your web presence.

What we learned about domain names at Pubcon

It’s so nice having someone else tell you about your product. We were at Pubcon in Las Vegas last week and visitors were sharing with us their stories of domain names. Instead of us straining our vocals against the ringing of Sin City, people like Angela St. Julien, who has Brand.Bar, told us these exact words: “Let’s get rid of the hyphens and start moving into the creative side with New TLDs [domain names.]” She even used a geeky term like “TLD.” Our people have arrived.

With recent products like the New Domains, we’re pretty stoked to meet a few exemplary usage cases. But at PubCon they lined up. Adam bought a .ACTOR for a client. Jeremy Chrysler owns Chrysler.NYC. Even former professional wrestling star Ric Flair said he’d love a .ROCKS. People were even suggesting aggregating your social feeds on a .SOCIAL. #Brilliant

Now your insanely active brain has a domain

Something happens to your brain with technology. It’s as if it’s been waiting for millennia, for thousands of generations, to have the chance to do as much as the internet allows you to do. The upside to digital innovations is that someone can now start a colossal company from their mother’s basement. The downside is that you’re supposed to start a colossal company from your mother’s basement.

Name.com Customer Rakes in Cash from .COM

There should be a business version of “stop and smell the roses” that goes something like “pause right now and talk to your customers.” Whenever we do we learn a lot, and Adam is no exception. We were excited enough to hear that a namer had won the Verisign .COM domain contest–well, he’s a semifinalist, but he has a check for five grand on the way–yet we were blown away that this is a guy behind the Singing Dogs because, for reals, he plays the saxophone and his dogs sing along. No, really, check out the video above.

Controlling the message: Why you probably don’t need to worry about .SUCKS

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Photo credit: JD Hancock

Let’s talk about “Obamacare.” Not the broad, sweeping health insurance program in general, but the word itself. It was originally meant to be derisive, painting the Affordable Care Act as the result of overreaching Executive power. At one point a Democratic Congresswoman objected to its use on Capitol Hill. But then something happened: it gradually took on a whole new life as a universal and sometimes affectionate term for the medical overhaul. The hashtag #ILikeObamacare trended when the bill was challenged in Supreme Court, and President Obama even started using it in his own speeches.

This is a classic example of one side making the best of an attack. They completely redefined it, and now they don’t need to get a .SUCKS.

8 awesome sites that use .TV domain names

As we’ve discussed before, there are a ton a great uses for .TV domains. The most obvious is having a .TV domain as the primary address for your site. That’s an awesome approach if you want to brand your site as video-focused. .TV is also great when used in conjunction with URL forwarding, as it allows you to create an easy-to-remember URL for the video section of an existing site, a YouTube channel, or even a one-off video that you want to share (like our new crazychild.tv video).

Another awesome thing about .TV domains? You can get them at name.com for $10.99. That’s crazy cheap, and it’s for a limited time only. Check out this list of successful sites making great use of a .TV domain, and then get your search on.

1. FORA.tv

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Protect your personal information with Whois Privacy

When you purchase a domain name from name.com you’re given the option to add Whois Privacy for $3.99 (for one year). What exactly is Whois Privacy?

First, let me explain the WHOIS (pronounced “Who Is”) database. It’s a list of every domain registered in the world. Whenever a domain is registered, the person buying the domain has to provide personal information, such as a name, phone number, and address, as required by ICANN. That information goes into the Whois database. The database is searchable, so if you own a domain and someone looks up that domain in the Whois database, they can see your personal information.

But not if you have Whois Privacy protection.

When you purchase Whois Privacy, we replace your personal information in the Whois directory with contact information that directs back to name.com. If someone wants to contact you about a domain—regardless of whether it’s a legitimate inquiry—they have to contact name.com first. Here’s an idea of what your Whois information looks like with and without Whois Privacy:

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