CATEGORY: Products

The Name.com Website Builder is Here

Remember when…

Many years ago the World Wide Web made a promise. It told people that they could build their own website and it would look sleek and pretty. Many websites were made, but many people were disappointed. Many websites have been abandoned, fading away as low-price, low-quality promises on the lonely outskirts of the Internet.

But today, we are here to fulfill that promise. Today … we introduce Name.com’s website builder.

SEO Series Part 2: Why Link Structure is So Important!

(If you’ve just shown up, click here for Part I of the SEO How-to Series. And welcome)

Links = Votes!

Links as votes is a helpful analogy to remember. Basically, if Page A links to Page B, then Page A is casting a vote that Page B is relevant to the keywords used in the link text or anchor text connecting the 2 pages (example: in the link to Name.com at the end of this sentence the “link text” or “anchor text” is domain name). In addition, votes can be stronger or weaker depending on factors like overall trust of the link, PageRank of the page it came from, and even how significant the relationship between Page A and Page B is.

In other words, the more votes that Page B gets, the higher the likelihood it will rank higher for keywords. The more internal links you provide that point to any given page on your site, the more opportunities there are for that page to rank highly for its targeted keywords. Here are three important internal “link structures” and some simple tactics to optimize them.

1. Global Navigation – The template for global navigation (including home page alt tag) is one of the most elemental starting points for SEO. This is especially true for large sites because the more pages your site has, the more votes the global navigation template is providing for you. This is not to say that you need to have lots of pages. By putting the right keywords in global navigation links like the drop-down menu, your site is more likely to get credit for any internal links. That’s why indexing the links is both important and helpful.

2. Link subsets – There can be any set of links existing on the page template which specifically targets page groups with targeted keyword phrases. This is an ideal vehicle for creating that ever-important link connectivity to the high priority pages. Typically, this is in the footer area or on the right column of the page. Sites may have buckets for “Related Topics” or “Most Popular Pages” or a similar subset which is both related to the main link and relevant. Look at the Name.com Footer for an example of how this is done.

3. Navigate the breadcrumbs – Breadcrumb navigation is an internal link structure that can enhance SEO; especially for any sub-pages that are not linked by global navigation. Any links appearing in the global navigation template will typically occur in the source code before any breadcrumb navigation or content links. This means that global navigation links supersede any other links on the page. Mainly because most search engines (like Google) only count the first link found in the source code between Page A and Page B. Any breadcrumb navigation links must be keyword focused as the primary purpose of them, SEO-wise, is to link to any pages outside of the global navigation template.

Remember that the main purpose for all three of these types of link structures is to direct users to the right information. When the link structures are keyword focused, it aids search engines and users in finding the relevant information.

Beer Friday: We got a Keg Cap Tap

The story around the office wasn’t so much our new gift, but that something had “cleared the war room”. The “war room” is where our dev team holes up in a small space withlegend of karate kid concentrates like a name.com developer charts, graphs, computers and the concentration of Mr. Miyagi. They stay there all day troubleshooting and brainstorming. It’s a big deal, and we’re told that those of us on the outside will never understand.

But then the the inventor of the Keg Cap Tap sent us “the perfect tap handle for every keg.” It was if the war room guys had just found out about sunshine. They wandered out into the open and gathered around the kegerator. With quiet admiration they celebrated the latest innovation in beer liberation.

The keg cap tap from Colorado inventor Matt Ferris.

Some of you may know that every keg comes with a little cap. It’s an identifier of what the keg is, and provides a modicum of protection to the valve that guards the nectar below. Until now it’s been popped off and stuck to someone’s head or flicked about in an impromptu game of table football. But now it has a new home.

keg cap tap stickers

And stickers!

Your stylish new cap-tapped keg tells everyone what they’re drinking so you don’t have to break from the courtship of your pint to field questions. Pretty dang cool, and Matt, the Colorado-based inventor who conjured this little bit of magic, sent it to us out the the goodness of his heart. Thanks Matt! This kegs for you!