CATEGORY: How-Tos

Awesome WordPress Resources to Make Your Website..Awesome!

WordPress is a thing of beauty. An open-source blogging platform that gives you complete freedom to quickly and easily create, update, and manage your website. The only downside to having that much freedom is that it can get a tad overwhelming. Below is a list of WordPress resources we’ve stumbled across in our internet travels, and we hope you find them as useful as we have.

WordPress Codex

WordPress has done a great job of putting together this extensive knowledge base that covers just about everything you can imagine in relation to WordPress.

WPBeginner

Great beginner’s guide to WordPress.

Lorelle on WordPress

Fantastic resource from one of the volunteers that helps out with WordPress support.

The Ultimate Guide To WordPress Hacks And Customizations

Great blog post featuring links to various sources that show you how to customize your site.

Theme Lab

A nice collection of free and custom themes as well as a nice general resource for WordPress.

Free Theme Layouts

A new personal favorite of mine.

WooThemes

Awesome premium themes for people with a little bit more of a budget.

Plugin Directory

If you want to add something to your site, chances are there’s already a plugin for it. Trada also has a good blog post on a few plugins to help get you started.

WordPress Hacks

A site for the slightly more seasoned WordPress user.

We Love WP

A gallery of slick looking WordPress-powered site and a nice source of inspiration.

Page.ly

If you’re self-hosting your WordPress site, Page.ly is an awesome service that takes away all of the hassle.

WordPress Publisher Blog

Helping you get the most out of WordPress.
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The list can really go on and on, but these links should be enough to help get you started. If there’s anything you’d like to add, let us know in the comments!

Check Out Our GeoDomain Tool!

Name.com GeoDomain Tool from Name.com on Vimeo.

Here’s a brief walk through of one of our nifty search tools you probably didn’t know we had. The Name.com GeoDomain tool is a great domain name suggestion tool if you’re looking to target a specific region with your website or business. Check out our video and then bring on the feedback! We’d love to hear what you think of the tool and how we might improve it.

Full IPv6 Support here at Name.com

There are a lot of doomsday predictions out there about IPv4 address running out soon (there is even a countdown page/iphone app etc.). Whether they are true or not (there are ways to delay the inevitable using NAT etc.) we at Name.com know IPv6 is the future. We always strive to be on the cutting edge of the domain registration world so we are announcing full IPv6 support across both our domain registration platform and our DNS platform. What does that mean? It means if you want to support IPv6 on your network, and you are a customer of ours, we have you all covered. 🙂 You can submit IPv6 glue records to the registries, and if you host your domain on our DNS platform, we can support networks that use IPv6 for querying DNS. What does it mean for the geeks in the house? Well read below to get some more in depth details.

What is IPv6

Here is the Wikipedia page about IPv6. Basically it’s the next generation IP addressing technology that provides a MUCH larger address space (2e128 to be exact). Unfortunately, a host/network has to specifically support IPv6 to receive traffic and so some key systems (like the DNS) have to specifically support IPv6 for two IPv6-enabled networks to support it. The nice thing is IPv4 and IPv6 traffic can ride over the same network, so no need to rip out the existing Intertubes, hardware just needs to support it (most newer computers, wirelress routers etc. already do). The are three ways a network can support IPv6 so that two hosts can communicate:

1. Not at all/IPv4 only The network can only send traffic over IPv4
2. Split IPv4/IPv6 If a source host wants to send traffic to a destination host, and both hosts support IPv6, the traffic is sent over IPv6. If only one or none of the two hosts support IPv6, the traffic must be sent over IPv4
3. IPv6 only (VERY RARE) The two hosts only support IPv6

Domain Registration/Glue Record Support

To support #2 above, the DNS has a special record type called a quad-A record (AAAA). It provides the IPv6 address of a hostname (similar to how an “A” record gives the IPv4 record for a hostname). An example:
Here is the IPv4 address for ns1.name.com

$ dig ns1.name.com a
ns1.name.com. 172800 IN A 173.192.28.4

Here is the IPv6 address for ns1.name.com

$ dig ns1.name.com aaaa
ns1.name.com. 172800 IN AAAA 2607:f0d0:1002:95::2

You can see the same hostname has two different IP addresses. What generally happens is a host that is enabled for IPv6 and IPv4 that wants to communicate with another host will first look up it’s AAAA record to see if the destination host also supports IPv6. If there is no answer for the AAAA record (meaning the destination host doesn’t want to or can’t speak IPv6) the sending host then looks up the A record and sends the traffic over normal IPv4. Name.com now allows a domain registered on our platform to submit IPv6 glue records to the various registries. This means if a customer hosts their own DNS, and their DNS servers support IPv6, they can submit those glue record entries to the registry.

DNS Platform

If a customer hosts their DNS on our platform, previously they could not support a recursive DNS server asking for the DNS information for their domain over IPv6 (remember recursive DNS servers ask the questions, authoritative DNS servers answer those questions – read more here at Wikipedia about DNS). We now fully support IPv6 transport to both ns1 and ns3.name.com, so if an end user of one our customer domains is on IPv6 only, or IPv4/IPv6 combo networks, that network can get the customer’s DNS information over IPv6.

Are that many people using IPv6?

Not a ton – BUT usage is growing steadily, and like other things (DNSSEC for example – a post will be coming shortly about this) – eventually a critical mass will be reached and a registrar MUST support it at that time. We just want to be ahead of the curve. 🙂

Why did we do this?

Because we want to be the coolest and most innovative registrar on the planet. Cheers!

Name Tip: How to Ensure a Smooth Domain Transfer

Here at Name.com we like to think of domain transfers like square dances — it’s easy to get tripped up, but when you know the steps it’s simple and straightforward.

There are a few tips you can follow before you start your transfer to help ensure that the experience will be as smooth as the dance floor at a senior center…wait…well you get the idea. However, should something go wrong along the way, our support staff is always here to help.

The following should be verified before you initiate your domain transfer:

  • The domain is unlocked.
    • This is a setting you can access from within your account control panel that allows you to transfer out your domain.
  • You have not registered the domain in the past 60 days.
  • You have access to the administrative contact email for the domain.
  • Your current registrar has no other reason to block the domain.
    • Sometimes registrars will deny a transfer if you have updated your contact information within the past 60 days, or if you catch them on a bad day. 😉

We also have some information about these tips on our transfer page.
Currently transfers to Name.com are starting at just $7.75, and in addition to getting great tools and customer support, transferring to Name.com also renews your domain for an additional year, leaving a little extra money in your pocket at the same time.

Hopefully these steps will help you with your next transfer. If your next transfer happens to be to Name.com, we look forward to working with you!

Name Tip: Better SEO with WordPress Permalinks

We’ve seen quite a few blogs recently that are running WordPress and using the default setting for permalinks. It’s unfortunate that this is the default, because it really does nothing for you in the way of SEO. However, there’s a quick fix for this that should help your blog posts get a little more notice.

If you log in to your WordPress blog and scroll down, you will see a “Settings” section on the left hand side. Clicking the arrow will drop down a menu and one of the options will be “Permalinks.” Clicking that will take you to the Permalinks page where you will see the different options you can choose.

The default looks something like http://blog.name.com/?p=167 and that doesn’t really tell readers or search engines anything about your post.

This can be easily changed on the Permalinks page by selecting either the Day or Month options, or even adding your own custom structure using the syntax that WordPress provides. You probably want to stay away from the Numeric option, as that won’t do much for your SEO either.

After saving your changes, your blog URL will look like http://blog.name.com/2010/06/name-tip-better-seo-with-wordpress-permalinks/, which is not only better for SEO, but now your readers have information like subject and date just by looking at your URL.

We hope that helps some of you out there that may not have even known this setting existed. Cheers and happy blogging!